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Clayton DeKorne

Clayton DeKorne rejoined JLC in July 2013 after a 15-year hiatus developing energy-code training for state energy offices. He is the founding editor of Tools of the Trades (1993) and Coastal Contractor (2004), and the founding educational director for JLC-Live (1995). Prior to joining JLC in 1988, he was a carpenter in Burlington, Vt, Annapolis, Md, and Colorado Springs, Colo. He is the author of Trim Carpentry and Built-ins (Taunton, 2002) and co-author of Finish Carpentry (Taunton, 2008)

 

Blogs by Clayton DeKorne

  • Drone Building Inspections

    The future is now: Inspectors turn to small, flying robots to scope out buildings.

     
  • Blasting Holes in Houses

    It's not as fun as a beer cannon, but it might lead to more tornado-resistant homes.

     
  • Mixed Reality: The Future of Building Design?

    Is augmented reality just a smart-phone party trick or could it be solace for an increasingly populated planet?

     
  • Mapping Green Space

    The EPA's EnviroAtlas provides a one-stop reference for identifying everything from population density and rainfall to "impaired waterways" and acid-rain concentrations.

     
  • Save the Trades

    Ottawa, Illinois high-school students shine in national spotlight for protesting the cut of building trades training.

     
  • Fleeing from Fire

    It's the stuff movies are are made of:  With only seconds to spare, a firefighter reaches project foreman Curtis Reissig, before a section of a blazing building collapses.

     
  • Have Strict Building Codes Saved Chile?

    Strict building codes and the preparedness of millions of Chileans have been credited with the low death toll after an 8.2-magnitude earthquake rumbled off the coast of northern Chile this week.

     
  • A Tale of Two Hazards

    There are no clear policies for the two biggest IAQ hazards - carbon monoxide and radon.

     
  • Gray Water's Time in the Sun

    As the California drought grinds on, renewed interest in using grey water heats up.

     
  • Sole Survivor. What's on Your Feet?

    Do you prefer sneakers or tennis shoes for lightness and agility on the jobsite? You might want to think twice about what you wear on your feet.

     
 

Articles by Clayton DeKorne

  • Working With Foam Subfloor Adhesive

    The pros and cons of working with DAP SmartBond polyurethane subfloor adhesive, which goes on like foam sealant but collapses to a sticky gel.

     
  • Clients from Hell

    Adam Shaf says a dispute with his former clients stems from them "not paying us for work, not because of poor workmanship."

     
  • Communities Mandate the Removal of Wood Roofing

    In an effort to curb the risk of wildfire destroying homes, more and more western communities push for the removal of existing wood roofing.

     
  • EPA Expands Oversight of Lead-Paint Rule

    Will remodelers come to dread a letter from the EPA more than one from the IRS?

     
  • Watertight Replacement Windows

    Flashing windows is not just for new construction. Here are details on how to help prevent window leaks when working around the major types of siding.

     
  • Insulating Cathedral Ceilings (Subscriber content)

    JLC executive editor Clayton DeKorne explores some practical solutions to prevent call backs and boost energy performance.

     
  • At wide spots in the trench, the foam is poured to a consistent thickness against a sheet of OSB.

    Retrofit Exterior Foundation Insulation (Subscriber content)

    Is there a minimally invasive, cost-competitive, easily deployable method of upgrading soil-side foundation insulation in existing buildings? Read on.

     
  • Encapsulating ducts with at least 1 1/2 inches of closed-cell spray foam substantially improves HVAC performance in all U.S. climate zones. Burying the encapsulated ducts in loose-fill attic insulation improves performance even more.

    Buried and Encapsulated Ducts (Subscriber content)

    Encapsulating ducts with at least 1 1/2 inches of closed-cell spray foam substantially improves HVAC performance in all U.S. climate zones. Burying the encapsulated ducts in loose-fill attic insulation improves performance even more.

     
  • Thermal Imaging With a Blower Door (Subscriber content)

    Though it's impossible to seal every hole in an existing building to prevent air leaks, here's a procedure you can use to identify the worst leaks in order to tighten the home as cost-effectively as possible.

     
  • Best Practices: Continuous Exterior Insulation (Subscriber content)

    A guide to selecting and installing rigid foam on walls.

     
 
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