Are you a subscriber but don’t have an online account?

Register for full online access.

 
 
 
 

Featured Articles

  • A builder on Martha's Vineyard used this cottage for himself and his family to learn the process of building a certified passive house.

    Building a Passive House for the First Time (Subscriber content)

    Builder Farley Pedler delves into high-efficiency Passive House construction by building his own passive house in Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

     
  • Why 'Energy-Saving' Tips Suck

    The truth is that commonly espoused energy-saving tips are worthless. We look at four common offenders.

     
  • Number of LEED Homes Has Doubled in Three Years

    California has the most LEED-certified homes, followed by New York and Texas.

     
  • Hardware on European windows allow them to tilt in for ventilation.

    A Look Through European Windows

    A behind-the-scenes look at the materials and methods used in making high-performance tilt-and-turn windows.

     
  • Studying Moisture in Fat Walls (Subscriber content)

    Comparing the performance of a cellulose-insulated double wall against the same wall insulated with two different thicknesses of low-density open-cell spray foam.

     
  • Mixed Reality: The Future of Building Design?

    Is augmented reality just a smart-phone party trick or could it be solace for an increasingly populated planet?

     
  • A Drywaller’s Approach to Air Sealing Homes (Subscriber content)

    Air leaks through the building shell can have a significant effect on a home’s durability, energy use, and indoor air quality. Myron Ferguson explains how drywall can be an important part of the air barrier of an enclosure.

     
  • ReVision Energys Dave Ragsdale connects the control circuit of the outdoor unit of a 1-ton Fujitsu mini-split on a home near Portland, Maine. In combination with a wood stove, the mini-split will mostly idle the homes existing oil boiler, except during the coldest part of the year.

    Heat Pumps for Cold Climates (Subscriber content)

    Mini-split heat pumps were a major topic at the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA) BuildingEnergy 14 conference in Boston this year. Ted Cushman explains why and how these mini-splits shine in cold climates.

     
  • Working With Flexible Flashing (Subscriber content)

    Some contractors still don’t understand how to get the most out of these products. Here are some tips for installations that stand firm for the long haul.

     
  • Making the Case for Zero-Leak Ducts

    Mike MacFarland outlines the benefits of leak-free ducts.

     
  • When it comes to improving the energy efficiency of a building, lots of attention is paid to insulation R-values, thermal bridges, and air sealing. But dont forget the windows, which account for the biggest energy loss in a high-R wall.

    To Improve the Energy Performance of Walls, Look at Total R-Value (Subscriber content)

    Today’s builders are learning to mitigate thermal bridging by using alternative framing techniques, continuous exterior rigid foam products, or both.

     
  • Insulating Cathedral Ceilings (Subscriber content)

    JLC executive editor Clayton DeKorne explores some practical solutions to prevent call backs and boost energy performance.

     
  • Tight House Construction - Sealing Exterior Sheathing Seams

    In my quest to build ever tighter houses I've decided that my goal is for every house I build to get as close to 1ACH50 as possible. To reach that goal, I've decided to take a page from the PassiveHouse playbook and tape my exterior sheathing seams.

     
  • Encapsulating ducts with at least 1 1/2 inches of closed-cell spray foam substantially improves HVAC performance in all U.S. climate zones. Burying the encapsulated ducts in loose-fill attic insulation improves performance even more.

    Buried and Encapsulated Ducts (Subscriber content)

    Encapsulating ducts with at least 1 1/2 inches of closed-cell spray foam substantially improves HVAC performance in all U.S. climate zones. Burying the encapsulated ducts in loose-fill attic insulation improves performance even more.

     
  • Building Above-Code Walls - Belfast, Maine, Cohousing Units (Subscriber content)

    Four design/build teams solve the puzzle of high-performance wall construction—in four different ways.

     
  • Building Above-Code Walls - Maine Single-Family Home (Subscriber content)

    The wall system shown here is an improved version of the system I used for the house I built in Knox, Maine, in 2011.

     
  • Building Above-Code Walls - "Avalon" a Connecticut Farmhouse (Subscriber content)

    Our wall example is part of a zero-energy single-family house built for the tenant farmer of an organic farm in rural Connecticut.

     
  • Building Above-Code Walls - Norwich, Vermont Single-Family Home (Subscriber content)

    Our challenge was to realize the owners distinctive artistic vision for their home, along with their very ambitious energy-efficiency goals, while also working within the hard limits of the budget.

     
  • Building Above-Code Walls (Subscriber content)

    Four design/build teams solve the puzzle of high-performance wall construction—in four different ways.

     
  • Thermal Imaging With a Blower Door (Subscriber content)

    Though it's impossible to seal every hole in an existing building to prevent air leaks, here's a procedure you can use to identify the worst leaks in order to tighten the home as cost-effectively as possible.

     
 
 
 
 
JLC Field Guide to Decking