The author’s PSA makes it clear he is to be paid for preconstruction consulting services, but that should he be awarded the contract, the fee will be applied toward the cost of construction. It also spells out the payment schedule for the work, just as any contract would.
The author’s PSA makes it clear he is to be paid for preconstruction consulting services, but that should he be awarded the contract, the fee will be applied toward the cost of construction. It also spells out the payment schedule for the work, just as any contract would.

It’s not uncommon for the sales process to end with the builder or remodeler acting as an unpaid consultant to a potential client. Most play this game hoping that the goodwill generated by such free advice will give them an inside track to the final construction contract. It seldom works out that way, though; more often than not, the job goes to someone else.

That doesn’t happen to me. The reason is that my estimating process includes a contract that compensates me for the consulting time needed to complete the clients’ plans and specs. I call the contract I’ve developed for this a professional services agreement, or PSA — and far from turning clients away, it has won me a good amount of business. In...

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