To schedule his jobs, the author writes each task on a Post-it and then arranges the notes on the wall. The tasks are color-coded: yellow for work activities; blue for owner decisions; green for materials that can be ordered without owner involvement; and purple for interactions with the bank or building inspector.
To schedule his jobs, the author writes each task on a Post-it and then arranges the notes on the wall. The tasks are color-coded: yellow for work activities; blue for owner decisions; green for materials that can be ordered without owner involvement; and purple for interactions with the bank or building inspector.

When I was in commercial construction, I used formal scheduling procedures on all of my projects. With formal scheduling, each task or activity in the job is written down, placed in sequence, and assigned a certain amount of time. Years later, when I switched to residential construction, I felt that houses were so simple a formal schedule wasn't needed. I decided I could get by with a daily to-do list and a list of future tasks. At first, things went smoothly with this approach, but before long I found that materials were not arriving on time, specialty contractors were not being given enough notice, and in general the house was not being built in the most efficient manner. All of this translated into more headaches and frustration and less profit for me.

The question was what to do about it. And the obvious answer was to formally schedule the house.

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