At 122 feet long and about 25 feet high, Vermontasaurus is substantially larger than most real dinosaurs. Its “backbone” is a roof truss salvaged from a building collapsed by heavy snow. Also included in its bulk are window frames, broken furniture, an old toboggan, a smashed acoustic guitar, and at least three nests built by local birds.
At 122 feet long and about 25 feet high, Vermontasaurus is substantially larger than most real dinosaurs. Its “backbone” is a roof truss salvaged from a building collapsed by heavy snow. Also included in its bulk are window frames, broken furniture, an old toboggan, a smashed acoustic guitar, and at least three nests built by local birds.

Post Mills, Vt., resident Brian Boland is an inventor, hot-air balloonist, and antique-car museum curator who also owns and operates a small airport. When heavy snows flattened one of his storage buildings a couple of years ago, he was left with a small mountain of salvaged lumber and a longtime dream. The two reached critical mass this past June, when Boland and about 100 volunteers armed themselves with hammers, a bucket truck, and several hundred pounds of assorted nails, and began banging together what eventually developed into a 122-foot wooden dinosaur that was quickly dubbed Vermontasaurus.

Thanks to some time-saving ground rules imposed by Boland, few tools or building skills were needed, and the entire process took a mere eight days. “The deal was that you weren’t allowed to cut anything to length,” he says. “No measuring, and no removing or rearranging anything already nailed in place. It speeded things up tremendously.”

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