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Nicer Knife. Builders who prefer a fixed-blade utility knife might want to check out the VR-Series from Tajima. Its key feature is a large thumbscrew that lets you change blades without using a screwdriver — or worrying about dropping the screw. Also handy are its one-piece hinged design and the magnet and spring clip that prevent the blades from tumbling out when the case is opened. The knife costs $10.

Tajima Tool Corp., 888/482-5462, tajimatool.com.

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Knock-Down Fixer. Spray-on textured drywall finishes are easy to install but tricky to patch. The Drywall Repair Tool is a template that makes it possible to replicate a knock-down texture using joint compound and a taping knife (instead of a messy hopper or spray can). For $18, you can buy an individual template to match fine, medium, or heavy textures, or you can spend $36 on a multipack containing all three templates.

Template, 800/331-6637, drywallrepairtool.com.

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Consistent Cuts for Cans. Ideal’s Adjustable Can Light Hole Saw is designed to carve perfect circles in drywall and ceiling tile. Its cutting range extends from 2 1/2 to 7 inches, so it can bore holes for fire sprinklers as well as for most recessed lights. Features include self-sharpening carbide-coated stainless steel blades and a built-in 3/8-inch arbor and pilot drill. The saw (with two removable dust shields) costs $27.

Ideal Industries, 800/435-0705, idealindustries.com.

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Versatile Nail Puller. Cleaning up old lumber typically requires an arsenal of tools, but the Nail Jack extraction pliers combine several functions in one: They can extract like a cat’s paw, clamp like bullnips, and pry like a crow bar. According to the maker, they pull staples and brads as easily as they pull common nails. The 11-inch-long tool sells for $30. An 8 1/2-inch-long version, the Nail Hunter, costs $25.

Nail Jack Tools, 877/785-5624, nailjack.com.

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