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Other stories by Glenn Mathewson

  • Step Flashing vs. Continuous Flashing

    Do a little homework before abandoning the decades-long practice of using step flashing with asphalt shingles.

  • Neutral Necessity: Wiring Three-Way Switches

    In the latest National Electric Code, every switch box in a habitable room or bathroom must now have a neutral (more accurately referred to as a “grounded conductor”).

  • A New Roof Poisons a Family

    Though at first the culprit appeared to be the furnace, it turned out that the roofers triggered the problem.

  • Planning Ahead for Combustion Air

    When tucking a fuel-burning appliance into a small utility room, provide sufficient ventilation for it to operate safely and efficiently.

  • Rules for Drilling and Notching Deck Framing

    Following these simple guidelines when modifying joists, beams, and posts will prevent structural problems later on.

  • Q&A: Alternative Stair Design

    When building a house with a loft accessed by a code-compliant stair, does a second, unorthodox, stair that leads to the same loft space have to comply with code as well?

  • Troubleshooting: Water Heater in a Crawlspace

    Vertical limitations and code requirements make it difficult to impossible to install a water heater in a crawlspace. Here's what you need to know.

  • Conventional Roof Framing: A Code's-Eye View

    When it’s boiled down, there are essentially two standard methods of roof construction, each having some flexibility. We explore both.

  • The Case of the Sobbing Siding

    On a callback for a siding leak, a building inspector discovers that his roof inspection hadn't been nearly thorough enough

  • Attaching Wood to Concrete

    Q: Do I have to use pressure-treated lumber when I'm attaching wood to concrete or masonry in "dry" situations - such as inside a basement or under the protection of a covered porch? I seem to remember from reading the code that treated wood is only required within a certain distance from grade.