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More stories about Backfill

  • A Rising Tide Lifts All Houses

    With at least one-third of their country below sea level, the Dutch don’t take the prospect of flooding lightly. But these days, the dual pressures of a growing population and limited space are forcing a re-evaluation throughout the Netherlands of land previously thought too wet or flood-prone for...

  • Marine-Quality Columns

    Miami’s STA Architectural Group originally planned to use solid ipe for the eight columns on this high-end residence, which is currently under construction in Bal Harbour, Fla. But when logs of sufficient size turned out to be unattainable, the firm asked Orleans, Mass., boat-builder Suzanne Leahy...

  • Roofing Under Cover

    According to Colin McGhee, thatched roofs are “a bit of a novelty in the United States.” That perception won’t be diminished by the job he took on this past winter when he and his crew thatched a Maine island retreat.

  • Fine Foambuilding

    After supplier quotes for the 1,000 ornamental balusters in a planned luxury home’s porch railings came in at $150 apiece, BOJ Construction of Boston decided to look elsewhere — namely in-house.

  • Yonder Underdome

    Underground dome home

  • Hidden Hatch

    Unwilling to sacrifice floor space to a standard stairwell in an already compact floor plan, architect Richard Morongell designed and built this custom hatch cover.

  • Job-Site Grind

    Many builders talk about sustainability, but John Suppes has actually put his money where his mouth is by purchasing an $80,000 waste grinder.

  • Next - A Snap-On Addition?

    Jigsaw-puzzle house

  • No Lot Too Small

    Plenty of business cards say “no job too small.” Builder Dan Upton and architect Jeff Shelton could reasonably have “no lot too small” printed on theirs. Not that either of them specializes in small projects — but they did complete a house on a 20-foot-by-20-foot lot in Santa Barbara, Calif.

  • Welcome to Your Future

    In October 2007, JLC illustrator Tim Healey envisioned a future in which pickup trucks would be replaced by freight-hauling bicycles. Who knew then that a few intrepid builders had already made the switch?