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More stories about Business

  • Use Excel to Budget Next Year's Project Mix

    Take some pain out of the yearly exercise of creating your jobs budget

  • Ellicott City & Columbia, Md.

    Although they represent different eras in Maryland's growth, Ellicott City and Columbia drive Howard County's economic and real estate development.

  • Using the NAHB Chart of Accounts to Organize Your Business Finances

    Here's an effective way to organize and categorize expenses and job-cost data and compare the results with your forecasts.

  • If Time Is Money, How Can I Control the Clock?

    Knowing how many jobs you need to complete and collect for on a monthly and quarterly basis is critical to meeting the financial goals you set for the period. But how do you know on a week-by-week — or even day-by-day — basis whether your jobs are moving you toward the goal line?

  • Strategic Budgeting and Your Break-Even Volume

    Take a look at your “break-even volume,” which is the bare-minimum volume of work that you need to complete (and get paid for) in order to keep your doors open.

  • Wilmington, Del.

    Home to many financial companies, Wilmington has been hit particularly hard by the recession. But local architects aren't completely without hope.

  • Managing a Construction Business by the Numbers

    Managing by the numbers

  • Putting Social Media to Work for a Construction Business

    Do you really need a “blog” for every house you start or a “Twitter feed” telling your prospects what you had for lunch? You just got your Web site up and running last year — isn’t that good enough?

  • My Piano Teacher's Advice Helps Me Run My Remodeling Business

    Not only do I lack any particular talent for playing the piano, but I didn’t even start taking lessons until early middle age — far too late to develop the neural pathways I’d need to play well.

  • Getting Certified for Home Energy Audits

    As the owner of a small remodeling and handyman company (nearly $1 million annual sales before the downturn), I’ve always been careful to stay focused on our core offerings — bathrooms, kitchens, basements, and small jobs ranging from two-hour service calls to week-long “honey do” lists.