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More stories about Energy

  • A Passive House Consultant's Toolkit

    In addition to the training, here are the tools you'll need to design a Passive House.

  • More Than 'Tips' Needed to Improve Energy Efficiency

    A thorough, step-by-step analysis that treats the home as an integrated system is the only route to true performance improvements, including lower energy bills and better indoor air quality.

  • Why 'Energy-Saving' Tips Suck

    The truth is that commonly espoused energy-saving tips are worthless. We look at four common offenders.

  • Studying Moisture in Fat Walls

    Comparing the performance of a cellulose-insulated double wall against the same wall insulated with two different thicknesses of low-density open-cell spray foam.

  • Heat Pumps for Cold Climates

    Mini-split heat pumps were a major topic at the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA) BuildingEnergy 14 conference in Boston this year. Ted Cushman explains why and how these mini-splits shine in cold climates.

  • Making the Case for Zero-Leak Ducts

    Mike MacFarland outlines the benefits of leak-free ducts.

  • To Improve the Energy Performance of Walls, Look at Total R-Value

    Today’s builders are learning to mitigate thermal bridging by using alternative framing techniques, continuous exterior rigid foam products, or both.

  • Retrofit Exterior Foundation Insulation

    Is there a minimally invasive, cost-competitive, easily deployable method of upgrading soil-side foundation insulation in existing buildings? Read on.

  • Buried and Encapsulated Ducts

    Encapsulating ducts with at least 1 1/2 inches of closed-cell spray foam substantially improves HVAC performance in all U.S. climate zones. Burying the encapsulated ducts in loose-fill attic insulation improves performance even more.

  • Venting the Crawlspace

    Most crawlspaces are vented to the outdoors, but encapsulating the crawlspace has gained favor among builders of green and energy-efficient homes. But what do you do about the air down there?