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More stories about LOUISIANA

  • Guest Editorial: Small Task, Big Reward

    Small Task, Big Reward

  • Low Country Rx: Wet Floodproofing

    Regardless of what the flood maps say today, the statistics show that flood zones will likely change during the service life of a home, making flooding an often inevitable consequence of coastal living. The answer, says building scientist Joseph Lstiburek, is to use drainable, dryable assemblies...

  • In the News

    U.S.-Canada lumber deal; FEMA guidelines; OSHA ruse; lead threat; more

  • The $87 billion question

    New Orleans — Bridget Vinson describes her company’s property managers as the stars who have helped her recover after Hurricane Katrina swamped this city in 2005.

  • Freddie stretches to make Gulf Coast deals work

    Freddie Mac and its lender partners are working closely with their Gulf Coast borrowers to make sure multifamily owners have the help they need to rebuild properties in communities devastated by Hurricane Katrina in August 2005.

  • Breakline

    Restoring Trust - School of Demolition - Tougher Codes - High Hazard Study - Storm-Tracking Tools

  • Rebuilding the Gulf: Cooling Strategies for the Gulf Coast

    In the hot, humid South, it's not enough to install high-efficiency air conditioning. Dedicated dehumidification, along with impeccable attention to sealing the building enclosure, is required. Researchers at LSU exhibit three practical systems that balance performance and cost in the "LaHouse"...

  • Genuine Mold

    It doesn't take a Category 5 hurricane to create a huge mold problem. Mold is rampant throughout the East and Gulf Coast regions. But coastal contractors need to know that mold is not toxic and does not cause diseases. It is simply an allergen that has to be dealt with accordingly.

  • Musicians’ village planned in New Orleans

    New Orleans was one of the most musical cities in the world until Hurricane Katrina devastated the community and dispersed its residents across the country.

  • New Orleans recovery lags

    New Orleans – Six months after Hurricane Katrina wreaked destruction on the Big Easy, efforts to rebuild and repopulate the city remain stalled, according to Amy Liu, deputy director for the Brookings Institution.