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More stories about Brick

  • Various Forming a Brick Shelf in a Concrete Foundation

    Q. I'm planning to form a simple 4-foot stem wall foundation for a single-story garage using plywood, snap ties, and walers. It needs to have a brick ledge for the top 10 to 12 inches, which will show above grade. What's a simple, effective way to do this

  • Building Stone Arches

    A veteran masonry contractor describes how he built a series of stone arches below a wood-framed terrace.

  • A Masonry Chimney in Six Hours

    No one likes waiting for the mason, but manufactured zero-clearance fireplaces aren't the only alternative. A Connecticut manufacturer describes his innovative precast chimney system

  • Q&A: Rebuilding Rotted Windows

    Q. As a handyman, one of the problems I see most often is rotted wood trim on windows and doors (for example, brick moldings, sills, and the bottoms of side jambs). Moldings are not usually a difficult fix, but repairing or replacing wood members that are integral to the window or door unit...

  • Exterior Details

    Drainage EIFS * Brick veneer * Wood deck ledger * Flashing a window

  • Trade Talk: Understanding Mortar

    Making sure of mortar types

  • Q&A: Bolting a Ledger to Brick Veneer

    Q. What’s the best way to attach a deck ledger board to a wood-framed house with brick veneer?

  • Q&A: Overhanging Brick Veneer

    Q. It’s not unusual for a foundation to be slightly out of square. If the house has brick veneer siding, it’s sometimes necessary for the first course of bricks to overhang the concrete foundation. What is the maximum safe overhang in such a situation?

  • A Stone Veneer Foundation

    A durable job depends on using the right mortar, anchoring the stone to the concrete, and providing weep holes for water that penetrates the veneer.

  • Making Brick Repairs Disappear

    Initial foundation settlement can leave vertical cracks in brick veneer cladding, which, though ugly, pose no structural problem. A North Carolina builder describes how he makes the repairs, using tricks gleaned from masons.