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More stories about Brick

  • Q&A: Removing Paint from Historic Exterior Brick

    Q: We are restoring a 19th-century Victorian home with a painted brick exterior. The client wants to remove the six or more existing layers of paint, down to the natural brick. What is the best way to remove the paint without destroying the brick or morta

  • Q&A: Water Treatment for Acidic Water

    Q: In the April 2000 issue of JLC (Letters), Rex Cauldwell recommended treating acidic water that eats copper pipe. Our water has a pH of 6.2 and definitely eats copper. What kind of water treatment equipment do I need? retrofit; painting interior brick

  • By Design: Masonry Façade Accents

    Using quoins to add visual appeal to brick facades

  • Foundation Footing Fundamentals

    Concrete expert Brent Anderson explains the code rules and structural issues surrounding foundation footings. Included are discussions of when and where to place rebar and what to do if a footing is poured slightly out of place.

  • Pan Flashing a Chimney

    In the face of Cape Cod’s wind-driven rain, lead pan flashings have successfully protected chimney openings for decades. A mason explains the installation process.

  • Q&A: Covering Up a Brick Fireplace

    Q: I am building an addition that will enclose the back side of an existing brick fireplace, which is now on the exterior of the building. Can 2x4 furring be attached directly to the brick?

  • Q&A: Replacing Chimney Counterflashings

    Q: Whenever I need to replace chimney counterflashings, I seal the top of the flashing with Quickcrete, using a caulk gun. This product is made for concrete repairs, and comes in a tube. I know that some people will mix up a little mortar for this job, and others use silicone or urethane caulk...

  • Simple Site-Built Mantels

    A production-oriented finish carpenter shows how to build elegant but affordable mantels from MDF and stock moldings.

  • Letters

    More on unvented crawlspaces, January cover questioned, rules of thumb for flue sizing

  • Keeping Water Out of Brick Veneer

    Contrary to popular perception, brick is not waterproof. Water gets behind it and can rot the structure and ruin finishes. A brick design expert describes the flashing and weep details that ensure water can get out from behind brick veneer before it causes problems.