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More stories about Casework

  • Reusing Barnboard

    Q: I was wondering what should be done to old reclaimed barnwood before it can be used inside a home. I plan on using it for wainscot in a basement remodel; should it be treated to kill any bugs or mold?

  • Permanent Wood Foundations

    Pressure-treated wood foundations (also known as permanent wood foundations, or PWFs) have been around at least since the 1940s, and my own experience with them dates back 20 years or so.

  • Staining Steel Garage Doors to Look Like Wood

    As the owners of a San Clemente, Calif., specialty painting company called Rags 2 Rich's, husband-and-wife team Rich Howe and Cindy Miller do a wide range of faux-finish work, including convincing renderings of masonry, plaster, and marble.

  • Precision Countersinking Drill Accessory

    ecause the Smart-Bit predrilling and countersinking tool is designed to perfectly match the shape, head diameter, and head angle of popular screws used for deck building and woodworking, it won't produce mushrooming when used with composites, says the maker.

  • Quick Porch Enclosure

    Over 20 years ago, on a vinyl siding job, I screened in a deck that had a shed roof.

  • Low-Formaldehyde MDF

    UltraStock-Free MDF by Temple-Inland has no added urea formaldehyde, meaning that it contains only trace amounts naturally found in the wood-fiber ingredient itself.

  • Drywall Upgrades

    Build arches, wainscot, and other architectural details with scrap drywall and specialty trim.

  • Mold on Framing Lumber

    I occasionally receive framing lumber that has some mold on it. Will this mold continue to grow and cause rot once the wood is in the dry? Do I have to clean it off? I'm also concerned about customer perception.

  • Wilsonart Contract Flooring Urban Renewal and Global Influence

    Eight new designs for commercial-grade high-laminate flooring based on urban and global designs.

  • Replacing a Wood Beam With Steel

    The LVL beam had been installed in an earlier remodel to replace structural partitions supporting the second floor. Since Cox knew that a flush steel beam could do the job just as well — but invisibly — he offered to include the swap-out in the contract.