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More stories about Copper

  • Q&A: Copper vs. Plastic Plumbing

    Q: I’m currently remodeling a vacation home where the copper plumbing has developed pinhole leaks because of an acid water condition. To save money, my client wants to replace the copper pipes with CPVC plastic, but my plumber says that’s a bad idea. Who’s right?

  • Plug-In Electrical Testers

    Using an inexpensive tester, you can troubleshoot a miswired receptacle without even removing the cover plate.

  • Letters

    Three-coat vs. one-coat stucco, wiring device needs further testing

  • Flashing the Tough Spots

    If you’re still using roll aluminum for all of your flashing, you may be inviting leaks and premature failure. Here’s an overview of the materials, techniques, and details that will make flashing last the life of the structure.

  • Letters

    Safe wiring practices, mechanical ventilation resource, computer jargon complaint

  • Q&A: Connecting to Aluminum Wiring

    Q: I recently did some work in a house where the electrician found aluminum wiring. The electrical inspector told us that pigtailing in standard devices with wire nuts was not acceptable. Instead, we must use aluminum-rated devices and special aluminum-to-copper connectors. I checked with the local...

  • Eight-Penny News

    Non-toxic treated wood, phone-in comp claims save money, more termite bashing

  • The Dirty Dozen -- Common Plumbing Service Calls

    Take a tour with a master plumber as he makes the rounds of the twelve most common plumbing repairs.

  • Q&A: Tracing 3-Wire Circuits

    Q: In many of the houses we work in, we are asked to evaluate the electrical system. We sometimes find 10/3 wire used on 110-volt circuits with 15- and 20-amp breakers in the panel. The installer has used the red and the black wire for separate circuits. Is this an acceptable installation or does...

  • Antiscald Protection for Showers

    Pressure-balancing valves are the most common way to meet antiscald requirements for showers. A master plumber tells how they work and gives tips for installing them.