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More stories about Development

  • Federal Judge Rules in Favor of Outer Banks Bridge Project

    A proposed replacement for the aging Bonner Bridge linking North Carolina’s Outer Banks to the mainland has overcome one legal roadblock, but the road ahead is still hard.

  • Are Lawyers Crushing The Condo Market In Denver?

    Big builders and developers are bowing out of the condo business in Denver, Colorado. Is it because of the out-of-control construction defect lawsuits?

  • Stanford White Site Marked for Development

    Anbau Enterprises purchased the lot in New York City’s Flatiron District where Stanford White used to entertain young girls, including his ill-famed mistress Evelyn Nesbit.

  • The Politics of Wind Power: Coastal States Vie for Position

  • Wilmington, Del.

    Home to many financial companies, Wilmington has been hit particularly hard by the recession. But local architects aren't completely without hope.

  • A Bridge From Two Flatcars

    Intelligent reuse allows an access driveway to cross a 38-foot span without damaging the stream below.

  • Bloomington-Normal, Ill.

    Despite the recession, there are shovels at the ready and cranes in the air around Bloomington and Normal, which are pushing green design.

  • Portland, Maine

    One of the few working waterfronts left in the United States, Portland is expanding beyond its seafaring tradition and embracing an entrepreneurial spirit.

  • Wetlands Done Right

    For coastal developers, the preservation of wetlands often seems like a hindrance to growth. But advances in the science of wetlands restoration and new environmental policy just may be able to find some common ground. Aaron Hoover looks at the issue of "compensatory mitigation" and the policy of...

  • America Circa 2030: The Boom To Come

    In 2030, there will be 106.8 billion square feet of new development, about 46 percent more built space than existed in 2000—a remarkable amount of construction to occur within a generation.