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More stories about Engineering

  • Solving the Uplift Puzzle

    Where the codes once concentrated mostly on verifying that buildings could handle gravity loads, now coastal homes must also resolve the complicated load effects associated with high winds: uplift, shear (or "racking"), sliding, and overturning. Ted Cushman takes a closer look at one kind of...

  • Letters

    Testing spray-foam jobs; ridge beams and collar ties; safety reminder; more

  • Engineered Lighting Products

    CLC Series-Cornice Cove Light.

  • Adding Up

    calculations: the word alone has a reputation of being both uninteresting and intimidating. However, lighting and its related calculations are a necessary component in any successful project, though more commonly a necessity in non-residential applications.

  • Exchange

    In order to practice architectural lighting design, should individuals be required to attend an accredited degree program followed by professional work experience and a licensing exam? Would establishing an education and licensing procedure for lighting designers more in line with the training of...

  • Move

    Philadelphia-based

  • Review: Strong, Safe, Foundations

    Faced with an unprecedented coastal reconstruction need post-Katrina, the mitigation arm of the Federal Emergency Management Agency has released FEMA 550, Recommended Residential Construction for the Gulf Coast: Building on Strong and Safe Foundations. This must-have document for coastal building...

  • Fixing Voids in Engineered Flooring

    Q. A subcontractor glued down 4 1/2-inch-wide plank engineered flooring on a concrete slab-on-grade using flooring adhesive applied with a V-notch trowel. But the instructions on the bucket indicated that a 1/4-inch square notched trowel should have been

  • Narrow Shear-Wall Solution

    Q. I'm the project manager for a construction company that's building a series of townhouses. In one of our designs, the garage walls are only 10 inches wide. There isn't any room to expand these walls, but they still need to be reinforced to prevent rack

  • Attaching Deck Ledgers to Engineered Rim Joists

    Q. Attaching Deck Ledgers to Engineered Rim Joists Are ledger lag-bolting schedules that were developed for 2-by rim joists adequate for engineered rims? It seems that lag bolts would be more likely to pull out of a thinner engineered rim than out of a thicker 2-by Doug fir rim joist.