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More stories about Heating

  • Q&A: Using an Electric Water Heater for Radiant Heat

    Q: In his November 1998 article, "Using Water Heaters for Radiant Heat," Bill Clinton shows how to heat a home with a gas water heater. Will an electric water heater work in this type of system? How about a tankless electric water heater?

  • Green Building For Profit

    These builders switched from commercial construction to environmentally responsible residential building — and they’ve learned how to make money at it.

  • Practical Details for an Energy-Efficient House

    A custom builder explains the simple steps he takes at the framing stage to create a tight, energy-efficient house.

  • Fine-Tuning Forced-Hot Air

    A heating contractor details how to upgrade from a typical bare-bones heating system to one that delivers comfort and customer satisfaction.

  • Q&A: Makeup Air for Fireplaces and Exhaust Fans

    Q: In a house I am building, I need to provide adequate makeup air for a fireplace and a 600-cfm cooktop exhaust fan. How do I size a passive duct to introduce exterior makeup air into the house?

  • Choosing a Whole-House Ventilation System

    Homeowners and code officials are beginning to insist on better mechanical ventilation systems. A ventilation expert helps you choose the best system for your climate.

  • Notebook

    High school vo-tech programs in decline; fiber-cement roofing woes; photovoltaic glazing; faulty hvac system proves deadly; more

  • Q&A: Radiant Heat Barriers

    Q: I have seen many ads for radiant barriers designed to save energy. Is there any evidence that these radiant barriers can reduce home energy costs? If so, in what climates are they most effective? How should they be installed?

  • Q&A: Too Much Thermal Mass?

    Q: When designing a radiant floor, can there be such a thing as too much thermal mass? Here in Alaska, we sometimes see the temperature jump from -10°F up to 40°F above in just a few hours.

  • Problem-Solving Products

    Building materials are always changing and so are the tools used to install them. Here’s a look at what’s new and worthy, from foundation to finishes.