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More stories about Job-Costing

  • Estimating Using Templates, Part Three

    Whether you estimate with an off-the-shelf system or using an Excel spreadsheet, most systems today are built around a database of unit pricing items. Here are some tips to get you started.

  • How to Calculate Unit Prices for Labor

    While unit prices for labor are available from a number of sources, the best source is a company's own job history. This article uses an example of framing an exterior wall to show how to use that data to calculate unit costs for labor based on material quantities.

  • Four Alternatives to the Competitive Bidding Process

    A recent experience got me thinking about the competitive bid process.

  • Faster Time Tracking

    This automated time clock can speed payroll, improve job-costing, and help you estimate more accurately.

  • Use Excel to Budget Next Year's Project Mix

    Take some pain out of the yearly exercise of creating your jobs budget

  • Using the NAHB Chart of Accounts to Organize Your Business Finances

    Here's an effective way to organize and categorize expenses and job-cost data and compare the results with your forecasts.

  • Strategic Budgeting and Your Break-Even Volume

    Take a look at your “break-even volume,” which is the bare-minimum volume of work that you need to complete (and get paid for) in order to keep your doors open.

  • Financial Statements: Above or Below-the-Line Costs

    In recent years I’ve spent a lot of time speaking to and consulting with builders and remodelers, big and small, and I’ve noted that there’s often confusion about what types of costs go where on a financial statement.

  • Job-Costing With Quicken

    Pushing this inexpensive checkbook program to its limits can give you a simple, streamlined approach to check writing, payroll accounting, and job-costing.

  • Treasury Blocks Fannie LIHTC Bid

    The Obama administration has blocked Goldman Sachs' bid to buy a significant amount of low-income housing tax credits (LIHTCs) from struggling Fannie Mae, according to several sources.