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More stories about Stucco

  • Q&A: Stucco Cracking Mystery

    Q: We have had good luck using the old-fashioned technique for exterior stucco: 1/2-inch plywood, felt paper, wire mesh, then 1 inch of plaster in three coats. Last year our luck ran out. We built a house on a hill where the wind just didn’t stop. A year later, one face — the gable end of a...

  • Notebook

    Widespread problem with leaky copper pipes, toxic mold blamed for infant deaths, recharging your NiCad batteries, lumber export fee agreement reached with Canada, U.S. importing drywall from Britain

  • Q&A: Patching Stucco

    Q: When making a patch in stucco, is it possible to use hydraulic cement or a fast-setting cement for the first couple of layers so that the patch can be completed in one day?

  • Working With Manufactured Stone

    As a veneer on exterior walls or masonry chimneys, manmade stone looks like the real thing, but without the weight and the cost.

  • Letters

    Stucco weep screed detail, piggyback truss bracing, stud sensor clarifications, termites & foam, site safety reminder

  • Common Construction Defects

    Defect litigation has become a billion-dollar industry in Southern California, driving many contractors out of business. A defect specialist describes the most frequent errors he encounters — from structure to finishes — and tells how to prevent them.

  • Stucco Flashing Details

    Like most claddings, stucco is not watertight unless it’s properly flashed. A stucco contractor explains how to detail openings, penetrations, and terminations to keep the water out.

  • Installing Water-Managed Synthetic Stucco

    Water leaking through poorly installed flashing and wall penetrations has proved the downfall of many EIFS jobs. A North Carolina plasterer explains how he replaces failed EIFS cladding with a two-coat stucco system specifically designed to prevent moisture damage.

  • Patching Stucco

    Making durable patches in stucco finishes is as much art as science. A veteran stucco contractor shows how to use dry dusting, fog coats, and trowel mix plastering both to repair damaged stucco and to blend new stucco work with old.

  • Controlling Moisture in Mixed Climates

    In climates that require both heating and cooling, humidity presents special problems for builders no matter what the season. These wall details will prevent damage to finishes and structural components from interior and exterior moisture.