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More stories about Stucco

  • Controlling Termites

    Getting rid of excess moisture around the foundation is key to controlling this pesky insect, but it may not always be enough. Shields and chemical treatments are still important backup measures, according to this nationally recognized entomologist and termite expert.

  • Extreme Stucco

    Hot and cold weather are the enemies of a durable stucco exterior finish. But by following these recommendations, you can apply a long-lasting, good-looking stucco finish in almost any kind of weather.

  • Window Trim for Thick Walls

    Thick energy-efficient walls call for special treatment of window jambs and trim. Whether the finish is stucco, drywall, or wood, these three builders have developed details that work.

  • Eight-Penny News

    U.S. Gypsum removes barrier EIFS from market, Big Apple plagued by exploding toilets, electrocution by crane, low-odor paints

  • Q&A: Wood Trim with Stucco

    Q: We will soon be building a stuccoed Tudor-style home. Standard practice in our area is to fasten the wood trim directly to the sheathing, then apply a three-coat stucco to the areas formed by the applied trim. How can the trim-stucco joint be detailed to prevent water infiltration?

  • Q&A: Should I Set Siding Nails?

    Q: When beveled wood siding is going to be painted, should the nails be set below the surface of the siding and filled, or driven flush with the surface of the siding?

  • Eight-Penny News

    Pier foundation failure, EIFS hides moisture problems, electrical code changes, termites versus foam

  • Letters

    Three-coat vs. one-coat stucco, wiring device needs further testing

  • Q&A: Patching Stucco With Mortar

    Q: We blocked over a couple of basement windows in a stuccoed stone foundation wall. What’s the best way to patch the stucco? Can a simple bagged mortar mix be used to cover the block, or do we need to use stucco?

  • Q&A: Rafter Framing With Unequal Wall Heights

    Q: How do you figure rafter lengths for a gable roof when one wall is 10 feet high, and the other is 8 feet high (illustration A)? The span of the building is 24 feet. We want the roof pitch to be the same on both sides.