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More stories about Testing

  • Letters

    Using PEX in solar water heating; solar hot-water storage; hot-water recirculation; leak testing

  • Strong Rail-Post Connections for Wooden Decks

    After testing deck ledger attachments, researchers at Virginia Tech crank up the loads on guardrail posts to see what it takes to make a code-worthy connection.

  • Drug Testing Employess

    Keeping up with tile standards; simple mosaics; laminates; decorative hardware

  • Practical Engineering: Load-Tested Deck Ledger Connections

    Virginia Tech researchers report the load test results of four ledger-board-to-band-joist connection details.

  • Pressure-Testing Ductwork

    Everyone talks about the importance of sealed ductwork, but the only way to be sure a new system measures up is to test it.

  • Designing & Testing Forced-Air Systems

    Here are steps you can take to ensure proper sizing and installation of air-conditioning and forced-air heating. Included is a list of detailed specifications that will guarantee state-of-the-art performance.

  • Have Asphalt Shingles Improved?

    Eight years ago, JLC took a look at widespread reports of cracking and splitting in fiberglass-mat shingles. In this update, we report how shingle manufacturers have responded to complaints, and how new product standards are making it easier to judge w

  • Q&A: Job-Site Glues

    Is white glue as strong as yellow glue? What’s the best glue to use when you can’t clamp the joint? We asked adhesives experts to answer these and many other questions, plus did a little testing of our own.

  • Q&A: Job-Site Glues

    Is white glue as strong as yellow glue? What’s the best glue to use when you can’t clamp the joint? We asked adhesives experts to answer these and many other questions, plus did a little testing of our own.

  • Q&A: Radiant Heat Barriers

    Q: I have seen many ads for radiant barriers designed to save energy. Is there any evidence that these radiant barriers can reduce home energy costs? If so, in what climates are they most effective? How should they be installed?