• Credit: M. Springer

 

There are many detailed sources of information available online from government and non-profit agencies on how to survive and then deal with the aftermath of natural or manmade disasters. From how to prepare supplies for an impending event to the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) to use while cleaning mold out of a flooded building, dozens of relevant topics are covered in the following links.

Since some of the information you find on one site may be slightly contradictory to that found on another site, I would recommend using such information as a general reference while deferring to local standards. Specific information on clean up, disposal, and rebuilding procedures provided by your state, county, or municipality should be used as the tiebreaker, depending on whose jurisdiction a specific property address falls within.

There are more links within these links and some of them refer back to one another but I have listed the most relevant topics so you can use this page as a jumping off point for each topic and return to this page so you don't get lost layers deep within the links.

Note: Bold links contain the most comprehensive or valuable information.

State of Colorado Resources

Colorado Dept. of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) Flood Resources
www.colorado.gov/cs/Satellite/CDPHE-EPR/CBON/1251645971558.

CDPHE Flood Recovery Guidance Document (compiled in response to the 2013 flood)
http://www.colorado.gov

American Red Cross

Flood Safety Checklist
www.redcross.org

Returning Home after a Hurricane or Flood
www.redcross.org

Repairing Your Flooded Home
www.redcross.org

Disaster and Safety Library
www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster-safety-library

Disaster Area Maps
maps.redcross.org

Disaster Related Links Indexed by State
maps.redcross.org

Links to Numerous Government Agencies
maps.redcross.org

Other Disaster Related Links--Resources for Mapping, Communications, Transportation, Utilities, Etc
maps.redcross.org

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Key Facts about Flood Readiness
emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/floods/readiness.asp

After a Flood
emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/floods/after.asp

Reentering Your Flooded Home
emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/mold/reenter.asp

Clean Up Safety Topics
emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/cleanup/

Cleanup of Flood Water
emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/floods/cleanupwater.asp

Mold after a Disaster
emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/mold/

Detailed Mold Hazard Report
www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5508a1.htm

EPA (Environmental Protection Agency)

What do I do about water from household wells after a flood?
http://water.epa.gov/drink/info/well/whatdo.cfm

What do I do with my home septic system after a flood?
http://water.epa.gov/drink/emerprep/flood/septicsystems.cfm

A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home
http://www.epa.gov/mold/moldguide.html

Mold Resources
http://www.epa.gov/mold/moldresources.html

Mold FAQs
http://iaq.supportportal.com

Websites and Contact Information for U.S. Cities, Counties, and Local Government
http://www.usa.gov/Agencies/Local-Government/Cities.shtml

EPA State and Regional Contact Information
http://www.epa.gov/iaq/whereyoulive.html

Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

What Consumers Need to Know About Food and Water Safety during Hurricanes, Power Outages, and Floods
http://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm076881.htm#s1

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

State Offices and Agencies of Emergency Management
http://www.fema.gov/state-offices-and-agencies-emergency-management

NationalCenterfor Healthy Housing

A Field Guide for Clean-Up of Flooded Homes
http://www.nchh.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=ANhnOoaHSfY%3d&tabid=311

OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration)

Disaster Site Worker Outreach Training Program
https://www.osha.gov/dte/outreach/disaster/index.html

Disaster Site Worker Training Outline
https://www.osha.gov/dte/outreach/disaster/disaster_procedures.html#1

Keep checking back for more coverage. Requirements of contractors that have been amended and even suspended by local and national building officials during this state of disaster are next followed by the account of one man's flooded workshop and what we learned about salvaging power tools and equipment. Also coming are reports on practical concerns to help contractors get on site and get to work such as dealing with roadblocks, insurance companies, and zoning regulations that may be subject to change due to the natural disaster.

This is the eighth in a series of reports intended to help inform both the victims of natural disasters as well as the contractors they look to in these times of crisis.