Using Siding Fasteners

Staples for siding
Many installers prefer staples for shingles and shakes because the thinner shank of the staple legs are less likely to cause splits.

Use two staples (minimum 7/16-in. crown, maximum ¾-in. crown per staple for each shingle or shake), with crowns placed parallel to the butt.


Nails for siding 
For best result use “splitless” ring-shank, or spiral-shank, siding nails. Textured heads will reduce the glossy appearance of the nail head. 

Figure: Selecting Siding Nails

For Cedar, Redwood, and Other Premium Board Sidings

For Cedar, Redwood, and Other Premium Board Sidings
Features Advantages
High-Grade Steel Under the galvanized coating, high-carbon steel minimizes bending, even with thin-shank nails.
Shank A ring-shank nail provides 50% to 100% greater holding power than a smooth-shank nail. Recommended penetration is 11/2 in. into the solid wood stud. A thin-shank nail will reduce wood splits that occur with standard-thickness siding nails.
Point A blunt point punches its way though siding material rather than wedging though wood fibers, reducing the chance of splits.
Head Size A small head helps to make the nail unobtrusive on fine wood siding. For painted sidings, choose a checker-head nail, which greatly increases paint adhesion.

For Hardboard, Plywood, and Fiber-Cement Siding

For Hardboard, Plywood, and Fiber-Cement Siding
High-Grade Steel Under the galvanized coating, high-carbon steel minimizes bending when the nail is driven through two laps of siding.
Threaded Shank A ring or a spiral shank provides much better holding power and reducing nail “pop-outs.”
Head Size Use a minimum 1/4-in.-diameter head for blind nails; use a larger roofing nail head for face nailing. A larger, flat head will help prevent the head from breaking through the surface.

For Vinyl Siding

For Vinyl Siding
High-Grade Steel Drives much better than aluminum nails.
Threaded Shank Spiral shanks hold much better than smooth shanks.
Head Size The large head allows the siding to hang properly without slipping though the expansion slot.
For long-lasting results, use only double hot-dipped galvanized, or stainless steel nails. Type 304 stainless is fine for most applications, but use 316 stainless steel nails in coastal nails. Also choose nails with an appropriate head, shank and point.
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