The four-passenger car on this elevator overlooking Ontario's Muldrew Lake has been custom-finished with red cedar siding. To prevent it from blocking the view from the deck, a programmable controller sends it out of sight down the slope 15 minutes after it comes to a stop at the top station. Entering a use code on the post-mounted control panel (at right in photo) calls it back for another trip.
The four-passenger car on this elevator overlooking Ontario's Muldrew Lake has been custom-finished with red cedar siding. To prevent it from blocking the view from the deck, a programmable controller sends it out of sight down the slope 15 minutes after it comes to a stop at the top station. Entering a use code on the post-mounted control panel (at right in photo) calls it back for another trip.

Waterfront property never goes out of style, and everyone likes a spectacular building site perched on high ground. But put the two together, and you need a safe and convenient way to go back and forth between them.

For some homeowners, the solution is what's variously known as a hillside elevator, tram lift, or hillside lift - essentially a wheeled elevator that rides on rails. (It's also sometimes referred to as a "funicular," although technically that label is reserved for a two-track system in which the weight of a descending car is partially...

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