Sheathing and Shear Panel

Manufactured Shear-Wall Components
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Manufactured Shear-Wall Components

For builders working in seismic zones or hurricane country, any structure has to... More

Bracing Walls for Wind
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Bracing Walls for Wind

You can frame a wall without hiring an engineer -- but plan review may give you... More

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Shear Wall Basics

Every few years earthquakes cause damage to buildings on the West Coast. We look at new, engineered building practices that are helping frame houses meet the test. More

Bracing Walls for Wind
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Bracing Walls for Wind

You can frame a wall without hiring an engineer -- but plan review may give you... More

Framing Red Flags
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Framing Red Flags

Catch these common framing and sheathing errors and you’ll prevent inspection... More

Gypsum-Board Firewalls
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Gypsum-Board Firewalls

A multifamily builder finds that gypsum-board area separation walls have some... More

Sheathing and Sheer Panels Instruction

Deep Rafters for a Massachusetts Passive House
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Deep Rafters for a Massachusetts Passive House

The massive ridge beam and deep I-joist rafters in this custom Passive House aren’... More

Building With Cross Laminated Timber
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Building With Cross Laminated Timber

The solid CLT panels simplify making the building envelope airtight, and they help... More

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Overdriven Fasteners in Zip System Sheathing

Q. When fastening ZIP System sheathing to wall and roof framing with our pneumatic nailers, we've found that it's difficult to keep nail heads from penetrating the applied protective barrier on the face of the panels. Won't these holes compromise the moisture barrier's integrity and lead to problems later on? Should they be covered with tape? And what happens if the ZIP tape fails? More

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Reinforcing Old Framing

Q: We're remodeling a 1930s vintage San Diego home and have to seismically reinforce its cripple walls with plywood, shear transfer plates, and hold-downs. Because all the framing is very dry and most of the cripples measure only 1 foot to 2 feet in lengt More

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Q&A: Nailing Sheathing on Valley Roof Trusses

Q. We’re framing a gable-roofed house with roof trusses. The roof includes a bumpout with a smaller gable roof that intersects the main roof, forming two valleys. A valley set will be installed on top of the main roof sheathing. The sheathing along the valley doesn’t have blocking for continuous nailing, and I’d rather not nail sheathing to sheathing. Should I install blocking between the framing members of the valley set to provide better nailing? More

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