Structural Insulated Panels

JLC Field Guide: Structural Insulated Panels

Structural Insulated Panels, or SIPs, are made by bonding structural sheet material — OSB is the most common but plywood, gypsum panels, steel, or fiber-cement are also used—onto both faces of an expanded polystyrene (EPS) or polyurethane foam core. They can be used to build floors, walls and roofs.

Building With Structural Insulated Panels
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Building With Structural Insulated Panels

SIPs produce a tight, well-insulated shell that takes less labor to construct than... More

Fast Floors With Structural Insulated Panels
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Fast Floors With Structural Insulated Panels

Using floor panels supported by engineered-lumber girders cuts production time on... More

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Working On a SIPs Roof

A look at the techniques used to add skylights and thermal solar collectors to a foam-core roof. More

Building a SIPs Roof
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Building a SIPs Roof

Complex roofs with hips and dormers can be assembled quickly using these... More

Fast Floors With Structural Insulated Panels
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Fast Floors With Structural Insulated Panels

Using floor panels supported by engineered-lumber girders cuts production time on... More

Structural Insulated Panels Instruction

Attaching Floor Framing to SIPS
Are Frost Stripes Cause for Concern?
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Are Frost Stripes Cause for Concern?

Last year we completed a SIP roof deck using two kinds of panels. Some were the... More

Rebuilding Bolivar
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How Strong Are SIPs?

Q: In a SIP, how secure is the bond between the OSB skin and the EPS (expanded polystyrene) core? Can this bond be compromised by water infiltration or insect damage, or could the insulated core deteriorate over time? If that bond were to fail, it seems to me the whole structure would fall apart like a giant house of cards. More

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Q&A: Swelling of OSB Roof Panels

Q. We build timber frame homes and wrap them with insulated panels made with skins of OSB on the outhouse and rigid foam insulation on the inside. We've been pleased with the results except for one thing: the swelling of the OSB at the edges. We've seen n More

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