Pocket hole joiney begins with drilling steep-angled holes with a special jig and drill bit. Pieces are joined temporarily with quick-release clamps while the screws are driven.
Gary Streigler Pocket hole joiney begins with drilling steep-angled holes with a special jig and drill bit. Pieces are joined temporarily with quick-release clamps while the screws are driven.

Since I first started working as a carpenter (more than 40 years ago), I have enjoyed the challenge of a client showing me a picture from a book or magazine and asking, “Can you do that?” These projects have ranged from elaborate mantels, staircases, and built-ins to wainscot, custom doors, and out-of-the-ordinary trim details. As my career progressed, I realized that most of these demanding projects required a way to join wood other than nailing pieces together.

At first I used dowels, and then I switched to a biscuit joiner, but things really changed for me when I saw the Kreg pocket-hole jig for the first time, at a trade show. What jumped out for me was that pocket-hole joints are very forgiving—I would need to machine only one side of the joint, and on large projects, I would be able to work on only...

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