This 2-ton Movin Cool Classic Plus 26 is a portable small package unit, which contains both the evaporative and condensing coils.
Matt Risinger This 2-ton Movin Cool Classic Plus 26 is a portable small package unit, which contains both the evaporative and condensing coils.

In the Austin climate, floorboards are usually delivered dry at 7% to 10% moisture content (MC), which is equilibrium moisture content (EMC) for wood in air at about 40% to 55% relative humidity (RH). But when wood acclimates to a higher RH, it takes on a higher MC and expands. We typically see the daily high RH averaging between 70% and 90% year-round—midsummer has the highest RH, and the lowest are in August and early September. If flooring is installed dry, as it is delivered, and then hangs out in these high-humidity conditions, it will absorb moisture from the air and expand. And when the floorboards expand, they have nowhere to go when they’re installed tight, resulting in permanent ridges where the boards press together (known as “compression set”). Or worse, they expand so much that whole boards buckle out of place. Either is an expensive fix. In colder climates, the reverse is usually true: The hardwood is installed at a higher MC and becomes bone-dry in the first heating season, causing gaps to open up between floorboards. Our goal is to keep wood materials at their dry, delivered moisture content between 8% and 10% MC by keeping the interior air at between 40% and 60% RH.

We begin conditioning the interior as soon as the house is dried-in and the insulation and drywall has been installed. Wood is not the only concern at this stage. While drywall is taped and finished, the curing mud adds moisture to the air, so we use industrial dehumidifiers to pull that moisture out of the air and industrial fans to move air...

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