One of the things I like about working on a historic home is the challenge of matching new work to old. Last summer, I was hired to do the finish work for a kitchen remodel in a 19th century Victorian home in Winona, Minn. The kitchen had been previously remodeled sometime in the 1960s in a contemporary style incompatible with the home’s period look. We replaced the door trim, matching the style of the original casing elsewhere in the home. The casing was a built-up treatment using several custom molding profiles. There were only five doors to trim — a small run to outsource to a millshop — so I decided to keep the milling in-house. Because the work was paint-grade, I used yellow poplar, a wood that mills well and takes paint nicely.

Stepped casing. The main body of the casing has a triple-stepped profile with a quarter-round bead along the inside edge. I ripped 1-by lumber to a finished width of 4 3/4 inches and then cut the bead on my router table. I made the steps in three successive passes on my table saw. Feeding the stock on edge, I started with the tallest cut, raised...

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