While the building code now allows you to install continuous flashing along a sloped roof-to-wall intersection, the author cautions against it and instead advises sticking with the long-accepted practice of installing step flashing, as shown in the illustration above. This detail is taken from detail ASPH-12A of the NRCA Roofing Manual: Steep-Slope Roof Systems—2013.
While the building code now allows you to install continuous flashing along a sloped roof-to-wall intersection, the author cautions against it and instead advises sticking with the long-accepted practice of installing step flashing, as shown in the illustration above. This detail is taken from detail ASPH-12A of the NRCA Roofing Manual: Steep-Slope Roof Systems—2013.

The development of the International Codes is a continuous process, with each code volume being revised on a three-year cycle. Changes are submitted and approved and can then be reviewed in subsequent cycles. Controversial changes get people and the building industry thinking, which is what happened recently with the way code looks at sidewall flashing in asphalt-shingle installations.

Step flashing has been required for asphalt shingles at roof-to-wall intersections as far back as the 1986 CABO. With this method, L-shaped pieces of metal that are a couple of inches longer than the shingle overlap are installed on top of each shingle adjacent to the sidewall, and the flashing is then laced into each course. Step flashing...

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