The first step should be to lay out the interior wall top plates with reference marks that will ensure the proper placement of the floating truss clips later on. This only takes a few moments when the building is not covered by a load of trusses. Don’t bother laying out the exterior walls because the eaves blocks will automatically do that for you. Simultaneously, another carpenter can cut backing for ceiling drywall that will later be nailed flat to the top plates. By quickly scratching the truss layout on the floor, you can identify the walls that need backing. I prefer to use 2x6 backing where possible, and only use 2x4s when a truss chord runs down the middle of a wall or along one side. A good trick for measuring lengths is to spread the stock alongside wall partitions and cut it in place, allowing a few extra inches to run past the corners. Once all the backing is cut, you can save time by temporarily hanging the material where it can be reached later on when standing trusses. Backing, eaves blocks, and outriggers with at least one nail started in them can be hung from nails placed on the inside of the exterior walls, a few inches down from where the stud butts the top plate. If you are using metal eaves vents, hang them up as well so they can be put in place as you stand the trusses. The metal flange on the ends is thin enough to allow it to be slipped in place between the two top plates. The important thing about hanging materials is to make sure that the pieces are completely out of the way below the plate line. With large spans with no center walls to stand on when raising trusses, it’s a good idea to build a catwalk. The most common areas for catwalks are in the garage and the living room. Keep the highest point flush with the top plate or just below. I prefer to use a flat 2x6, held on each end by a cleat fastened to the wall, with 2x4 legs nailed on for mid-span support. Catwalks should be plenty strong for safety’s sake.

I use 1x4s nailed to the top chords to secure trusses as they are tipped up to their proper spacing. Other 1x4 bracing, called "lacing," is nailed in permanently at locations specified by the truss manufacturer’s engineering plans. Truss installers have to follow the manufacturer’s plans exactly to ensure that a truss roof system...

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