Download PDF version (2510.6k) Log In or Register to view the full article as a PDF document.

Phase 3: Fashioning the Bullnose Trim and Post Cap

Launch Slideshow

3. I fastened the cap to the post with glue and headless pins.

A Contemporary Box Newel Post

Fashioning the bullnose trim and post cap

A Contemporary Box Newel Post

Fashioning the bullnose trim and post cap

  • Bullnose Trim

    1. I made the trim that hides the joint between the two paneled sections with a large beading bit mounted in a handheld router.

    http://www.jlconline.com/Images/tmp7352%2Etmp_tcm96-1495278.jpg

    true

    1. I made the trim that hides the joint between the two paneled sections with a large beading bit mounted in a handheld router.

    600

    I made the trim that hides the joint between the two paneled sections with a large beading bit mounted in a handheld router.

  • Bullnose Trim

    2. After cutting the profile in 5/4 poplar stock, I ripped off the 34-inch bullnose.

    http://www.jlconline.com/Images/tmp7353%2Etmp_tcm96-1495281.jpg

    true

    2. After cutting the profile in 5/4 poplar stock, I ripped off the 34-inch bullnose.

    600

    After cutting the profile in 5/4 poplar stock, I ripped off the 3/4-inch bullnose.

  • Bullnose Trim

    3. I ran the trim through a planer to clean up the surface, then glued and pinned it in place.

    http://www.jlconline.com/Images/tmp7354%2Etmp_tcm96-1495286.jpg

    true

    3. I ran the trim through a planer to clean up the surface, then glued and pinned it in place.

    600

    I ran the trim through a planer to clean up the surface, then glued and pinned it in place.

  • Post Cap

    1. To make the cap, I glued up a 2-inch-thick block using two lengths of 4/4 poplar. I ripped the stock to equal half the width of the top of the post plus another 12 inch for the overhang. I then ripped a 35-degree bevel angle on one surface.

    http://www.jlconline.com/Images/tmp7355%2Etmp_tcm96-1495290.jpg

    true

    1. To make the cap, I glued up a 2-inch-thick block using two lengths of 4/4 poplar. I ripped the stock to equal half the width of the top of the post plus another 12 inch for the overhang. I then ripped a 35-degree bevel angle on one surface.

    600

    To make the cap, I glued up a 2-inch-thick block using two lengths of 4/4 poplar. I ripped the stock to equal half the width of the top of the post plus another 1/2 inch for the overhang. I then ripped a 35-degree bevel angle on one surface. Because it's a potentially dangerous cut, I used a featherboard and push-stick to run the stock through the tablesaw.

  • Post Cap

    2. That is a potentially dangerous cut, so I used a feather board and push stick. On the miter saw, I cut four triangles from the block and assembled them to form the square cap.

    http://www.jlconline.com/Images/tmp7356%2Etmp_tcm96-1495292.jpg

    true

    2. That is a potentially dangerous cut, so I used a feather board and push stick. On the miter saw, I cut four triangles from the block and assembled them to form the square cap.

    600

    On the miter saw, I cut four triangles from the beveled stock and assembled them to form the square cap.

  • Post Cap

    3. I fastened the cap to the post with glue and headless pins.

    http://www.jlconline.com/Images/tmp7357%2Etmp_tcm96-1495297.jpg

    true

    3. I fastened the cap to the post with glue and headless pins.

    600

    I fastened the cap to the post with glue and headless pins.

I shaped bullnose trim to dress up the transition between the tapered section of the newel post and the straight top section; it also hides the joint. The post cap finishes off the top of the newel and conceals its hollow innards. In the accompanying slide show, you'll see how I:<\p>

  • Shaped the bullnose profile with a hand-held router fitted with a beading bit
  • Beveled 5/4 poplar using a table saw to create stock from which the post cap would be made
  • Assembled four triangles cut from the beveled stock to fashion the post cap
  • Attached the post cap to the newel post