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A Better Bulkhead. Bilco is celebrating its 75th anniversary with improvements to its Classic Series steel bulkhead. Changes include a new low-VOC primer by Sherwin-Williams and gas spring lifters, which help raise the doors and keep them from slamming shut. The product comes in several sizes and two models to fit either flat or angled stairway walls. Prices start at about $500. Bilco, 800/854-9724, bilco.com.

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Slick Nail. Paslode has developed a nail that takes less energy to drive, making it a good option for engineered lumber. The company says a special coating makes it so smooth it can be driven into LVLs with a hoseless nailer. As an added benefit, using these nails increases the altitude range at which nailers are effective (our testing in Denver was especially promising). The 30-degree full-round-head nail comes in 3- and 3 1/4-inch sizes and is sold in combination packs of one fuel canister with 1,000 nails or three cans and 3,000 nails. The smaller pack goes for about $30. Paslode, 800/222-6990, paslode.com.

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Space Saver. LiftMaster’s Model 3800 jack-shaft garage-door opener mounts on the wall next to the door and attaches directly to the door’s torsion bar, freeing up overhead space. The system includes a powered deadbolt that locks automatically when the door is closed and a remote light triggered wirelessly by both the opener and a motion detector. The 24-volt DC motor can also be wired on the wall with an optional low-voltage kit. The opener costs $350. Chamberlain Group, 800/528-5880, liftmaster.com.

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Heat Recovery. By recovering heat from household wastewater, the Power-Pipe can reduce water-heating expenses by up to 40 percent, the maker says. It consists of a section of drainpipe with a wrap of supply tubing. The pipe connects to the drain line with hubless clamps, and the wraparound tubing gets fed into the supply side of the water heater. A 5-foot section of 3-inch pipe costs $630. RenewAbility, 877/606-5559, renewability.com.

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Headroom. HyLoft ceiling storage units take advantage of the open space beneath tall garage ceilings and come in a range of sizes from 3 by 3 feet to 4 by 8 feet. The Model 540 pictured measures 45 by 45 inches and holds a maximum of 250 pounds; multiple units can be interconnected for more storage space. Heights can be adjusted from 16 to 28 inches so that units can be installed above garage doors or hung from sloped ceilings. Each unit costs about $60. Diamond Storage Concepts, 702/685-1700, hyloft.com.

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Fill Valve. The Hydro Clean 660 by MJSI has a couple of features not found on most toilet fill valves. First, it can be adjusted to make the tank and the bowl hit their fill levels simultaneously, preventing water waste caused by the bowl filling faster. Water savings can be as high as 30 percent, the maker says. Second, the valve has water jets that remove sediment and slime from the bottom of the tank with each flush. It’s available online for about $15. MJSI, 888/466-5741, gomjsi.com.

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Weathertight. The ClamDoor is a lightweight fiberglass alternative to traditional basement bulkheads. According to the maker, the design incorporates elements of sailboat technology. The hatch lid is held open with pneumatic lifters, and it seals closed with a flexible gasket. The gel-coat finish can be painted or left as is. The product comes in 64- and 72-inch lengths and costs $1,490 and up. ClamDoor, 888/344-2526, clamdoor.com.

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King-Size Sheets. TallWall lets you sheathe today’s taller walls without creating horizontal seams. The extra-long OSB panels come in 9- and 10-foot lengths. When installed vertically, says the maker, the product reduces air infiltration by up to 60 percent and makes the wall assembly much stronger, especially if it overlaps joist areas. A 10-foot panel costs about $13.50. Norbord, 416/365-0705, tallwallosb.com.

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Quiet Operation. The Synoris garage-door opener is the most popular opener in Europe, claims the manufacturer. Now it’s available in the U.S. It has an unusual design: Instead of a belt or chain lifting the door, the 24-volt DC motor itself travels along the central rail, hauling the door with it. Because the drive gear is the only moving transmission part, the product is much quieter than most openers, says the company. It costs $200 and up. Sommer USA, 877/766-6607, sommer-usa.com.

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Trench Drain. Quick Drain’s new Pro Line linear trench drain fits a wider range of finished floor thicknesses than the company’s previous offerings and comes in more designs and sizes. The 1 1/2-inch-wide grille is made in five patterns in brushed, polished, or satin stainless steel, and fits flush in floors from 3/16 inch to 2 1/2 inches thick. It’s sold in 10 standard lengths from 26 to 68 inches and in custom sizes from 10 inches to 10 feet. A 48-inch drain costs about $365. Quick Drain USA, 866/998-6685, quickdrainusa.com.

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Well Treated. Power Preserved glulam beams are treated with Cop-Guard, a solvent-based copper naphthenate formulation. According to the maker, they’re less likely than CCA- and ACQ-treated beams to warp, twist, cup, bow, swell, or shrink, so original design values can be used. They’re stainable and paintable and noncorrosive to fasteners and come in 3 1/2- or 5 1/4-inch widths, with depths from 9 1/4 to 18 inches and spans up to 52 feet. Prices start at $8.75 per foot. Anthony Forest Products, 800/221-2326, anthonyforest.com.