Cutting the base to size was easy. The instructions recommend scoring and snapping the base, as you would do with drywall, but with a product this costly I wanted to make sure I had a clean cut. So I cut first from the top, using a utility knife.
Cutting the base to size was easy. The instructions recommend scoring and snapping the base, as you would do with drywall, but with a product this costly I wanted to make sure I had a clean cut. So I cut first from the top, using a utility knife.

As a second-generation tile setter — I started working in my father’s tile business as a teenager — I’ve installed hundreds of shower pans. Tiled shower pans are not something you want to take risks with; leaks are expensive to repair and can cause serious structural damage in wood-framed houses. Years ago we settled on a reliable installation method for tiled shower pans: Chloraloy membrane, from the Noble Co. (noblecompany.com), installed over a sloped subbase, running to a three-part weeping drain, followed by a sloped mud bed. I’ve built shower pans using this method for years and have never had a problem.

There are some new shower-pan systems available that use a surface-bonded waterproofing membrane and skip the weeping drain. I’m not a big fan of these products, though I do occasionally install them when a GC requests it. When I was asked by a local builder to try out the ProBase pan from Noble, I was interested for a couple of reasons. First,...

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