The farmhouse sink has risen from the salvage yard to become an increasingly popular option in today's kitchen. Also called an apron-front sink, the traditional farmhouse sink was hung on the wall at a height that suited Mrs. Greenjeans. But today, wall hanging is the exception, not the norm, making installation more of a challenge. Because many of these sinks are now custom made, and most have unusual installation requirements, planning for a farmhouse sink should begin early in the kitchen design stage.

Special cabinet requirements can come into play. For example, reinforcement may be necessary under a vitreous china or fireclay sink, which can easily weigh in the hundreds of pounds empty. A deep bowl is one of the appeals of these sinks, but there's no single standard among the many designs and makers. The supporting cabinet must be either...

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