OSHA

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In the News

New pressure-treated lumber promises less corrosion; OSHA decides employers must pay for safety gear; more More

Safety First: OSHA's Big Four

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is focusing its attention on what some call the 'Big 4' causes of jobsite injuries and deaths: falls, trench and excavation accidents, electrocutions, and workers being struck by or caught by equipment. In addition to the focus on these hazards, local emphasis by OSHA compliance officers on specific aspects of jobsite safety, like scaffolding for example, means they may stop to inspect a site even if they don't see evidence of violations. Then, any violation they do see can lead to trouble?and costly citations. More

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In the News

U.S.-Canada lumber deal; FEMA guidelines; OSHA ruse; lead threat; more More

Power Rules: Avoid Jobsite Electrocution

You may not think much of taping up a dinged extension cord, but this common practice is not only dangerous, but it also could set you up for a hefty fine if an OSHA compliance officer sees it in use. Here are some serious reminders about electrical safety. More

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Staging High Work

New scaffolding products and personal safety gear make it easier than ever to perform high work safely. More

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Q&A: Fall Protection Criteria

Q: Your May 2001 article "Fall Protection Update" says that OSHA Standard 29 CFR 1926 requires fall protection for anyone working above 6 feet. Here in Washington state, I understand that the standard applies when there is a 10-foot fall potential. What a More

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Notebook

Free safety training for small builders, mold and moisture bankrupt big builder, plastic lumber ages well, New York builders liable for fall-related injuries, self-cleaning windows, more More

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Torchdown Roofing Basics

A metal roofing contractor explains why he uses single-ply modified bitumen for low-slope applications and how he installs it safely. More

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Resources

Safety videos More

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