I like the idea of a mobile, versatile, space-saving-miter saw workstation for shop and jobsite—preferably both. This one from Bora seems mainly designed for a shop application where you have a reliably flat floor, which I often don’t encounter remodeling older homes. Assembly is bolted-together steel parts; pretty straightforward and easy. The fine-tuning and adjusting can be a bit more challenging.

The Portacube ships disassembled. Assembly is reasonably easy. Fine-tuning the adjustments are a little more finicky.
Cliff Woodman The Portacube ships disassembled. Assembly is reasonably easy. Fine-tuning the adjustments are a little more finicky.
It worked well and provided additional horizontal space on site.
Cliff Woodman It worked well and provided additional horizontal space on site.

First, the basics. Once I had it assembled and set up inside the building I was working in, it was great to have the flat work space available. Since I had no way of locking it up at night, I did not actually bolt my miter saw to the unit, but instead just sat my smaller saw on it and adjusted the risers on the left and right to match the saw’s deck height. It worked well like this and it was nice to have the extra space for a tape measure, pencil, notes, and the like. It even served as a plan table. The two wings are easily lifted into place to give you approximately 7 feet of work surface and then easily lowered when not needed. The 10-inch wheels made it easy to roll around,and with a working height of 34 inches, it’s comfortable and stable.

With the wings extended, we had about 7 total feet of level working space.
Cliff Woodman With the wings extended, we had about 7 total feet of level working space.
The main assembly was easy, but dialing in the adjustments took more time.
Cliff Woodman The main assembly was easy, but dialing in the adjustments took more time.

All told, this is a great concept and we got a lot of use out of it, but maybe a couple minor tweaks could streamline Portacube’s performance. It obviously has been designed with mobility and shipping costs in mind (small boxes are cheaper to ship than big ones), which is evident in the assembly design.

This lever was impeded when the unit racked, but otherwise worked well.
Cliff Woodman This lever was impeded when the unit racked, but otherwise worked well.
The 10-inch wheels are nice, and the unit is heavy but mobile.
Cliff Woodman The 10-inch wheels are nice, and the unit is heavy but mobile.
The unit I got needs to be set up on a flat floor so its fold-away top deck can fold away. If not, the frame racking causes pinch points.
Cliff Woodman The unit I got needs to be set up on a flat floor so its fold-away top deck can fold away. If not, the frame racking causes pinch points.
I think some welds would help. The unit worked as advertised; I think it is probably best suited to small shop use.
Cliff Woodman I think some welds would help. The unit worked as advertised; I think it is probably best suited to small shop use.

I did have a couple of problems rotating the top of the unit when the unit was not sitting perfectly flat and level. It has a tendency to rack just enough that the table can’t spin. Possibly a couple more strategically placed braces might fix this. It would be significantly more stable when deployed and could be used on jobsites as well as in the shop. I also had a little trouble with getting the handle to slide up and down due to this misalignment. Again, I think a welded solid unit may be better overall.

So the long & short of it is: If you have a small shop with a concrete floor, or even work trailer (Editor’s Note: Cliff’s work trailer is amazing. Check it out here), and need to conserve space, you could definitely benefit from the Bora PM-8000 Portacube. It does do what it was designed to do, but does require a bit of time to get it fully adjusted. As for out in the field, it will work. Just take the time to make sure it’s sitting on level ground.
$350.

I give it 4 out of 5 Hammers.