There is a wide range of replacement window glass upgrades available, and options can add energy efficiency as well as solar heat-gain and increased fade protection. We all know the better the R-value, the more efficient the window glazing is, but what about energy transference with metal spacers and coatings? And what about high-performance Low E coatings, UV protection, and insulating chambers filled with Krypton or Argon gas?

Let’s start with the simplest glazing unit and work our way upwards with available options.

  • Double Glazed with Clear Glass and non-metal spacer - R-value of 2
  • Double Glazed with Low-E Glass on one pane, Argon Gas and non-metal spacer - R-value of 4
  • Triple Glazed with Low-E Glass on two panes, Argon Gas and non-metal spacer - R-value of 6
  • Triple Glazed with Low-E Glass on two panes, Krypton Gas and non-metal spacer - R-value of 9

ProVia takes some of the confusion out of energy-efficient options with their simplified descriptions and illustrations.

Glazing Options for ProVia Windows
Glazing Options for ProVia Windows

Windows that qualify for Energy Star can take some of the quandary out of the equation as well. Installing ENERGY STAR certified windows, doors, and skylights lowers energy bills and saves your customers money. More efficient windows use less energy, which reduces greenhouse gas emissions from power plants and homes. Low-emissivity coatings on many ENERGY STAR certified windows, doors, and skylights reduces UV sun damage to floors, carpets, and furniture. All ENERGY STAR windows, doors, and skylights are certified and verified to perform as labeled.

Understanding the ENERGY STAR® - NFRC Label helps, too. Here’s What You Need to Know

U-Factor – Insulating value of the entire window system. Lower numbers reflect better insulating value.
Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) – Amount of heat from the sun passing through the glass. Lower numbers show glass is keeping heat from entering your home.
Visible Transmittance – Amount of visible light passing through the glass. Higher numbers show glass is allowing more light to enter your home.
Air Infiltration – How much air is entering or escaping through the window. Lower numbers show air is kept from entering or escaping.
Condensation Resistance – Amount of moisture it takes for glass to condensate when exposed to extreme interior and exterior temperature changes. Higher numbers show better resistance to condensation.

To learn more about insulated window glass, please click here.