Colonial architecture is broken into three separate periods. The First Period homes are little more than lean-tos and log cabins—that’s where the working class would have lived. Most of our clients would have lived in Georgian-style homes, and the casing around doors would have included crossette architraves—small horns or rectangular extensions at the head jamb, formed by additional miters in the casing. In more-opulent homes, such as the John Brown home below, ornate entablatures and pediments would have been added above the casing.
Gary Katz Colonial architecture is broken into three separate periods. The First Period homes are little more than lean-tos and log cabins—that’s where the working class would have lived. Most of our clients would have lived in Georgian-style homes, and the casing around doors would have included crossette architraves—small horns or rectangular extensions at the head jamb, formed by additional miters in the casing. In more-opulent homes, such as the John Brown home below, ornate entablatures and pediments would have been added above the casing.

While I spend much of my time traveling around the country teaching carpenters and contractors the ins and outs of finish carpentry, I don’t often have the opportunity to work for myself—until recently. I bought a home in the Pacific Northwest and during the remodel, I decided to trim all the windows and doors in a Craftsman style, which I’ve always admired because it’s a perfect blend of classical architecture and gothic ornamentation.

If the terms Craftsman, classical, and gothic have you scratching your head, I’m hoping this article will give you some insight into the history and design of the trim that we install in clients’ homes every day.

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