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Glass mat flashing. Next, a bedding coat of resin is applied at the cant strips, then a 9-inch strip of 2-ounce fiberglass mat is pressed into place (Figure 7).

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Figure 7. At cant strips, a band of fiberglass mat is pressed into a bedding coat of resin (top left), then coated with more resin (top right) and rolled with a small steel roller to force out any trapped air (above left). Door sills get the same treatment (above right). Then, more resin is used to "wet it out," and the whole thing is rolled with a small (1-inch-diameter) grooved steel roller to force out any air trapped under the mat. Excess resin is cleaned off the roller periodically with acetone. After all of the cant strips are treated, the same process is repeated at all of the railing post bottoms. Strips of glass mat are also wrapped over the 1x4 drip edge at the rim joist (Figure 8).

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Figure 8. At the railing posts and perimeter drip edge, fiberglass mat flashing is bedded flush with the backcut bottom edge and wrapped up onto the deck surface, then coated and rolled.

The edge of the mat strip is lined up with the backcut bottom edge of the drip edge, "wet out" with resin, and rolled over on top of the deck. Particular care is taken where the drip edges meet the walls to prevent any voids from developing that might lead water into the structure. About 100 linear feet of edging can be flashed in 11/2 hours.