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To judge by its dimensions — 45 feet by 6 feet 6 inches — the structure at 128 Day Avenue in Toronto has more in common with a bowling alley than with a residence. And in fact, the site it occupies was originally meant to be an alley. But in 1912 an enterprising local builder named Arthur Weeden, noting that the city hadn't cut the curb to allow vehicles to pass, decided to shoehorn a small house onto the narrow lot.

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Among its other advantages, the house at 128 Day Avenue has little exterior siding to maintain. Its north wall is flashed directly to the adjoining residence, while an 18-inch passageway on the neighbor's land provides access to the south wall.

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In the bedroom, a custom cabinet conceals a fold-down bed that fills the entire room — from wall to wall — when released.

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At just under 300 square feet, interior space is at a premium, but the home does have a nice little back terrace, with off-street parking for two cars beyond — a sought-after amenity in Toronto.

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The view just inside the foyer extends all the way to the other end of the building. The intervening bathroom is entered through an 18-inch-wide door.

For more than 25 years, Weeden himself lived there, first with his wife and then — after her death — alone. The property changed hands several times over the following half-century; the current owner, David Blois, remodeled it extensively before putting it on the market last fall for $179,900. As of this writing it's still available — the perfect place, as real estate people like to say, for the right person.