Figure 1. Miter joints stay tight only when temperature and humidity match the day they were installed. When the weather changes, miters tend to open up and allow water to get in and cause rot.
Figure 1. Miter joints stay tight only when temperature and humidity match the day they were installed. When the weather changes, miters tend to open up and allow water to get in and cause rot.

As a business owner, I try to minimize marketing and warranty costs. The most sensible way to do that is to build a finished product that looks as good in ten years as it does right after completion. A good looking job provides free advertising for my company, and the low maintenance of a durable exterior cuts down on callbacks and increases customer satisfaction.

I make it a policy to return to past projects regularly to see how the materials and techniques I use are faring. This practice has sometimes taught me more than I really wanted to know, but at least I’ve learned which exterior details do and don’t work over time.

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