Download PDF version (242.4k) Log In or Register to view the full article as a PDF document.

Framing Roofs With Steel - Continued

Gable-End Walls and Eaves

There are several ways to frame gable-end walls, but our approach is to cut a section of flange from the upper end of each gable-end stud with a circular saw equipped with an abrasive blade. A short right-angle cut forms an attachment flange that's bent outward with a pair of duckbill locking pliers. The bottom of the stud is screwed to a track section on top of the wall below, and the upper end is screwed to the end rafter (Figure 3).

Image
Image
Gable-end studs are notched and bent to form attachment flanges before being screwed to the end rafters (top). Note the green layout line on the stud, drawn with a permanent marker before the flange is formed with duckbill locking pliers (above). Limitations of all-steel eaves. In a conventionally steel-framed roof, the rafters extend all the way to the eaves, and a track member is screwed to the outboard ends to serve as a subfascia. We've found this to be ineffective for several reasons. First, it results in a fascia that's perpendicular to the plane of the roof. The detail common to our area, and the one we prefer, uses a vertical fascia and a horizontal soffit. To do that with steel, you need to have a subfascia custom-made on a roll former or use one made from a cut-down track section attached with clip angles. And, no matter how it's put together, an all-steel eaves detail makes life difficult for the siding contractor, since the aluminum fascia and vinyl soffit can only be fastened to the steel framing with screws. Steel frame, wood eaves. To avoid those problems, we've devised a way to use wood members for the rafter eaves and subfascia. We stop the steel rafter flush with the exterior wall framing and fasten short lengths of 2x4 to them with an air nailer (Figure 4). After making a plumb cut at the end of each rafter tail, we nail a wood subfascia in place.

Image
Image
To simplify installation of the soffit and fascia, short sections of 2x4 stock are air nailed to the rafter tails (top). The rafters are screwed to the ceiling joists, forming a rigid assembly (above).

We also use a wood subfascia at the rake, by extending the OSB roof sheathing a foot or so beyond the outside wall and air nailing a 2x6 subfascia to the sheathing. The siding sub then installs the finish fascia and soffit the usual way, with light-gauge trim nails.

Jon Henderlong

is the former operations manager of Generation Homes in Valparaiso, Ind.