Shingle and Shake Coverage

The same shingles and shakes used to cover roofs may be used as siding; however, different maximum exposures apply (see Figure: Shingle and Shake Maximum Exposures in Weather Exposure). Also, manufacturers package their shingles differently. The number of shingles in a bundle may vary, depending on the mill, so always check the label for the number of bundles required to make one square at the baseline exposure. Refer to Shingle Wall Coverage and Shake Wall Coverage figures, below, to calculate coverage.

Figure: Shingle Wall Coverage (sq. ft.) at Various Exposures
Assumes single-course application; some exposures require double course
Weather Exposure (in.) Length and Thickness (in.) 1
16 x 5/2 18 x 5/2 1/4 24 x 4/2
3 1/2 70
4 80 72 1/2
4 1/2 90 81 1/2
5 100 90 1/2
5 1/2 110 100 73 1/2
6 120 109 80
6 1/2 130 118 86 1/2
7 140 2 127 93
7 1/2 150 136 100
8 160 145 1/2 3 106 1/2
8 1/2 170 154 1/2 113
9 180 163 1/2 120
9 1/2 190 172 1/2 126 1/2
10 200 181 1/2 133
10 1/2 210 191 140 4
11 220 200 146 1/2
11 1/2 230 209 153
12 240 5 218 160
12 1/2 227 166 1/2
13 236 173
13 1/2 245 1/2 180
14 254 1/2 6 186 (1/2)
14 1/2 193
15 200
15 1/2 206 1/2
16 213 7

To calculate quantity of shingles needed:

  1. Calculate total area to be sided;
  2. subtract area of openings greater than 50 sq. ft.;
  3. add 5% of adjusted total area for waste;
  4. select nearest approximate coverage for the shingle size to be used;
  5. divide by 100 to find number of squares of material needed for the job. For double-course applications, divide by 50 to calculate actual squares needed.

In addition to field coverage found in tables:

  • Add one square for every 100 vertical ft. of corners. (For smaller jobs, figure one bundle for every 25 ft. of corners if material comes in a four-bundle square, or one bundle for every 20 ft. of corners if material comes in a five-bundle square.)
  • Do not subtract area of openings unless their area is greater than 50 sq. ft.
  • Add an additional 5% for waste.
  • For starter courses, add one square for every 120 lin. ft. of wall skirt for single-course applications, or one square for every 60 lin. ft. of wall skirt for double-course applications.
Figure: Shake Wall Coverage (sq. ft.) at Various Exposures
Assumes single-course application; some exposures require double course
Shake Type, Length, and Thickness (in.) Weather Exposures (in.)
7 8 1/2 10 11 1/2 14 16 18
18 x 1/2 Handsplit and Resawn Mediums 70 85 100 115 140 8
18 x 3/4 Handsplit and Resawn Heavies 70 85 9 100 115 140 10
No. 1 18 Taper-Sawn 70 85 11 100 115 12 140 160 180
24 x 1/2 Handsplit and Resawn Mediums 70 85 100 115 13 140 160 180
24 x 3/4 Handsplit and Resawn Heavies 70 85 100 115 14 140 160 180
No. 1 24 Taper-Sawn 70 85 100 115 15 140 160 180
24 x 1/2 Taper-Split 70 85 100 115 16 140 160 180
18 x 3/8 True-Edge Straight-Split 50 17 60 71 82 100 18
18 x 3/8 Straight-Split 82 100 19 118 135 165 20
24 x 3/8 Straight-Split 70 85 100 115 21 140 160 180
  1. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.
  2. Maximum recommended weather exposure for double coursed wall construction.

To calculate quantity of shakes needed:

  1. Calculate total area to be sided;
  2. subtract area of openings greater than 50 sq. ft.;
  3. add 5% of adjusted total area for waste;
  4. select nearest approximate coverage for the shake size to be used;
  5. divide by 100 to find number of squares of material needed for the job. For double-course applications, divide by 50 to calculate actual squares needed.


Starter Course

The underlying course can be either the No. 1 grade product used on the outer course or a lower-grade product.


Starter Course for Shingles and Shakes

Starter strip is not recommended for shingle and shake siding. Use a starter course of shingles instead (see Starter Course in Double-Coursing). A lower-quality shingle grade, such as No. 3 Black Label or No. 4 undercoursing, is a suitable starter course for sidewall shingles and shakes. Note: This means that double-course shingle and shake applications start with three courses.


  1. Sum of the shingles stacked; e.g., 5/2” means 5 butts = 2” thick

  2. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  3. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  4. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  5. Maximum recommended weather exposure for double coursed wall construction.

  6. Maximum recommended weather exposure for double coursed wall construction.

  7. Maximum recommended weather exposure for double coursed wall construction.

  8. Maximum recommended weather exposure for double coursed wall construction.

  9. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  10. Maximum recommended weather exposure for double coursed wall construction.

  11. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  12. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  13. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  14. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  15. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  16. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  17. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  18. Maximum recommended weather exposure for double coursed wall construction.

  19. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

  20. Maximum recommended weather exposure for double coursed wall construction.

  21. Maximum recommended weather exposure for single coursed wall construction.

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