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Flashing an Open Valley

by Jim Bennette

Even though there’s no critical reason to use an open valley on an asphalt-shingled roof, our customers occasionally request it because they like the way it looks. We begin by installing a 3-foot-wide self-adhering waterproof membrane the full length of the valley, overlapping the peel-and-stick with the roof underlayment by at least 12 inches (1). We then install 12-inch-wide 16-ounce copper in 10-foot lengths, overlapping the ends by 6 inches (2). Where the valleys meet at the ridge, we overlap and fold the copper over the top (3). Next, we apply a 12-inch-wide strip of self-adhering membrane over the long edges of the flashing, covering the nails in the copper and following a chalk line to delineate the open valley — 3 inches wide per side (4). We cut the valley shingles to these lines, marking the angle with a hook blade (5) and making the cuts with a shear (6). Finally, to prevent angled tips from protruding and catching water, we crop the top corners of the shingles before installing them (7).

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Jim Bennette is a roofing contractor in Brewster, Mass.


Through the Cabinet, Into the Crawlspace

by Chris Kennel

During a remodel of their house, the homeowners mentioned that they’d never liked the look of the access panel to the crawlspace and asked us if we could do something about it. Even though they never used the crawlspace (1), we knew we had to preserve access to it, so we offered to turn the opening into storage space that retained the access. The customers liked the idea, so we had our cabinetmaker build a cabinet (2) with a removable back — it’s released by a simple hand-tightened knob near the bottom. Before installing the cabinet, we framed underneath so it could support a person’s weight. With the doors open and the back removed, there’s room for an average-sized person to climb through to the crawlspace.

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Normally, we would have insulated behind the cabinet, because it projects into an unconditioned space. But since it’s located right next to the kitchen and the homeowners wanted to store beer and wine there, we left off the insulation.

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With the doors closed and a fresh coat of paint (3), the owners are pleased with the new look — and function — of the stairway.

Chris Kennel works for City Side Remodeling in Denver.