A Purinton Builders crew places a residential foundation slab at dawn on a winter morning. With the appropriate mix design and good control of the concrete temperature in the ready-mix truck, says Purinton, his crews can safely place slabs in freezing weather, without a heated enclosure or sometimes, even blankets.
A Purinton Builders crew places a residential foundation slab at dawn on a winter morning. With the appropriate mix design and good control of the concrete temperature in the ready-mix truck, says Purinton, his crews can safely place slabs in freezing weather, without a heated enclosure or sometimes, even blankets.

On a 9°F day in December 2014, Connecticut concrete contractor Dennis Purinton was pouring a slab on grade. It was the kind of work Purinton had done often enough before. But this time, he had a small audience of experts and supplier representatives from around the concrete industry—some of them, like Purinton himself, members of the consensus committee that creates ACI 306, the American Concrete Institute’s Guide to Cold Weather Concrete.

Purinton’s goal was to demonstrate for his audience—and, by extension, for the full ACI 306 committee—something that he already knew from decades of experience working in New England conditions: “Concrete performs very, very well in cold weather.”

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